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Volume 23, Number 2—February 2017

Research

Swine Influenza Virus (H1N2) Characterization and Transmission in Ferrets, Chile

Nicolás Bravo-Vasquez1, Erik A. Karlsson1, Pedro Jimenez-Bluhm, Victoria Meliopoulos, Bryan Kaplan, Shauna Marvin, Valerie Cortez, Pamela Freiden, Melinda A. Beck, and Stacey Schultz-Cherry2Comments to Author 
Author affiliations: University of Chile, Santiago, Chile (N. Bravo-Vasquez, C. Hamilton-West); St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee, USA (E.A. Karlsson, P. Jimenez-Bluhm, V. Meliopoulos, B. Kaplan, S. Marvin, V. Cortez, P. Freiden, S. Schultz-Cherry); University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA (M.A. Beck)

Main Article

Figure 5

Replication of influenza viruses in vivo. To evaluate pathogenicity in mice, 6- to 8-week-old BALB/c mice (n = 11 mice/group/experiment) were infected with 105 50% tissue culture infectious dose (TCID50) units of the indicated viruses and weight loss was monitored for 14 days postinfection (dpi) (A). At 3 dpi and 6 dpi, lungs (B) and nasal washes (C) were collected from 3 mice/group and viral titers were determined by TCID50 analysis. Data are presented as mean ± SEM. *p<0.05 versus sw/Chile

Figure 5. Replication of influenza viruses in vivo. To evaluate pathogenicity in mice, 6- to 8-week-old BALB/c mice (n = 11 mice/group/experiment) were infected with 105 50% tissue culture infectious dose (TCID50) units of the indicated viruses and weight loss was monitored for 14 days postinfection (dpi) (A). At 3 dpi and 6 dpi, lungs (B) and nasal washes (C) were collected from 3 mice/group and viral titers were determined by TCID50 analysis. Data are presented as mean ± SEM. *p<0.05 versus sw/Chile virus.

Main Article

1These first authors contributed equally to this article.

2These senior authors contributed equally to this article.

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