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Volume 24, Number 1—January 2018
Research

Characterization of a Feline Influenza A(H7N2) Virus

Masato Hatta1, Gongxun Zhong1, Yuwei Gao1, Noriko Nakajima1, Shufang Fan1, Shiho Chiba, Kathleen M. Deering, Mutsumi Ito, Masaki Imai, Maki Kiso, Sumiho Nakatsu, Tiago J. Lopes, Andrew J. Thompson, Ryan McBride, David L. Suarez, Catherine A. Macken, Shigeo Sugita, Gabriele Neumann, Hideki Hasegawa, James C. Paulson, Kathy L. Toohey-Kurth, and Yoshihiro KawaokaComments to Author 
Author affiliations: University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, USA (M. Hatta, G. Zhong, Y. Gao, S. Fan, S. Chiba, K.M. Deering, T.J. Lopes, G. Neumann, K.L. Toohey-Kurth, Y. Kawaoka); National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan (N. Nakajima, H. Hasegawa); University of Tokyo, Tokyo (M. Ito, M. Imai, M. Kiso, S. Nakatsu, Y. Kawaoka); The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California, USA (A.J. Thompson, R. McBride, J.C. Paulson); US Department of Agriculture, Athens, Georgia, USA (D.L. Suarez); The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand (C. A. Macken); Japan Racing Association, Tochigi, Japan (S. Sugita)

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Figure 1

Phylogenetic tree of influenza A viral HA segments. Phylogenetic analysis was performed for selected influenza A viruses representing major lineages. The evolutionary history was inferred using the neighbor-joining method (12). The optimal tree with the branch length sum of 1.22521320 is shown. The percentage of replicate trees in which the associated taxa clustered together in the bootstrap test (500 replicates) is shown next to the branches (13). The tree is drawn to scale, with branch lengths

Figure 1. Phylogenetic tree of influenza A viral HA segments. Phylogenetic analysis was performed for selected influenza A viruses representing major lineages. The evolutionary history was inferred using the neighbor-joining method (12). The optimal tree with the branch length sum of 1.22521320 is shown. The percentage of replicate trees in which the associated taxa clustered together in the bootstrap test (500 replicates) is shown next to the branches (13). The tree is drawn to scale, with branch lengths in the same units as those of the evolutionary distances used to infer the phylogenetic tree. The evolutionary distances were computed using the Tamura 3-parameter method (14) and are in the units of the number of base substitutions per site. The analysis involved 44 nt sequences. Codon positions included were 1st + 2nd + 3rd + noncoding. All positions containing gaps and missing data were eliminated. The final dataset contained a total of 1,612 positions. Evolutionary analyses were conducted in MEGA7 (15).

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1These authors contributed equally to this article.

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