Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

Volume 15, Number 2—February 2009

Volume 15, Number 2—February 2009   PDF Version [PDF - 12.55 MB - 223 pages]

Research

  • Kupe Virus, a New Virus in the Family Bunyaviridae, Genus Nairovirus, Kenya PDF Version [PDF - 257 KB - 8 pages]
    M. Crabtree et al.
        View Abstract

    We have previously described isolation and preliminary identification of a virus related to Dugbe virus (DUGV), family Bunyaviridae, genus Nairovirus. Six isolates of the virus were obtained from pools of Amblyomma gemma and Rhipicephalus pulchellus ticks collected from hides of cattle in Nairobi, Kenya, in October 1999. We report results of further characterization of this virus, including growth kinetics in cell culture and full-length genome sequencing and genetic characterization, which show it to be distinct from DUGV. We suggest that this is a new virus in the family Bunyaviridae, genus Nairovirus, and we propose that it be designated Kupe virus.

        Cite This Article
    EID Crabtree M, Sang R, Miller BR. Kupe Virus, a New Virus in the Family Bunyaviridae, Genus Nairovirus, Kenya. Emerg Infect Dis. 2009;15(2):147-154. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080851
    AMA Crabtree M, Sang R, Miller BR. Kupe Virus, a New Virus in the Family Bunyaviridae, Genus Nairovirus, Kenya. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2009;15(2):147-154. doi:10.3201/eid1502.080851.
    APA Crabtree, M., Sang, R., & Miller, B. R. (2009). Kupe Virus, a New Virus in the Family Bunyaviridae, Genus Nairovirus, Kenya. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 15(2), 147-154. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080851.
        Email Email this Article
  • Oseltamivir-Resistant Influenza Viruses A (H1N1), Norway, 2007–08 PDF Version [PDF - 292 KB - 8 pages]
    S. H. Hauge et al.
        View Abstract

    In Norway in January 2008, unprecedented levels of oseltamivir resistance were found in 12 of 16 influenza viruses A (H1N1) tested. To investigate the epidemiologic and clinical characteristics of these viruses, we used sequence analysis to test all available subtype H1N1 viruses from the 2007–08 season for resistance. Questionnaires from physicians provided information on predisposing diseases, oseltamivir use, symptoms, and complications. Clinical data were obtained for 265 patients. In total, 183 (67.3%) of 272 viruses were oseltamivir resistant. Resistance was not associated with prior use of antiviral drugs. Symptoms and hospitalization rates did not differ for patients infected with a resistant or a susceptible virus. Oseltamivir-resistant influenza viruses A (H1N1) did not show diminished capability to spread in the absence of selective pressure. The ability of these viruses to sustain their fitness and spread among persons should be considered when shaping future strategies for treating and preventing seasonal and pandemic influenza.

        Cite This Article
    EID Hauge SH, Dudman S, Borgen K, Lackenby A, Hungnes O. Oseltamivir-Resistant Influenza Viruses A (H1N1), Norway, 2007–08. Emerg Infect Dis. 2009;15(2):155-162. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.081031
    AMA Hauge SH, Dudman S, Borgen K, et al. Oseltamivir-Resistant Influenza Viruses A (H1N1), Norway, 2007–08. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2009;15(2):155-162. doi:10.3201/eid1502.081031.
    APA Hauge, S. H., Dudman, S., Borgen, K., Lackenby, A., & Hungnes, O. (2009). Oseltamivir-Resistant Influenza Viruses A (H1N1), Norway, 2007–08. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 15(2), 155-162. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.081031.
        Email Email this Article
  • Epidemiology of Vibrio parahaemolyticus Outbreaks, Southern Chile PDF Version [PDF - 197 KB - 5 pages]
    E. Harth et al.
        View Abstract

    Disease outbreaks caused by Vibrio parahaemolyticus in Puerto Montt, Chile, began in 2004 and reached a peak in 2005 at 3,600 clinical cases. Until 2006, every analyzed case was caused by the serovar O3:K6 pandemic strain. In the summer of 2007, only 475 cases were reported; 73% corresponded to the pandemic strain. This decrease was associated with a change in serotype of many pandemic isolates to O3:K59 and the emergence of new clinical strains. One of these strains, associated with 11% of the cases, was genotypically different from the pandemic strain but contained genes that were identical to those found on its pathogenicity island. These findings suggest that pathogenicity-related genes were laterally transferred from the pandemic strain to one of the different V. parahaemolyticus groups comprising the diverse and shifting bacterial population in shellfish in this region.

        Cite This Article
    EID Harth E, Matsuda L, Hernández C, Rioseco ML, Romero J, González-Escalona N, et al. Epidemiology of Vibrio parahaemolyticus Outbreaks, Southern Chile. Emerg Infect Dis. 2009;15(2):163-168. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.071269
    AMA Harth E, Matsuda L, Hernández C, et al. Epidemiology of Vibrio parahaemolyticus Outbreaks, Southern Chile. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2009;15(2):163-168. doi:10.3201/eid1502.071269.
    APA Harth, E., Matsuda, L., Hernández, C., Rioseco, M. L., Romero, J., González-Escalona, N....Espejo, R. T. (2009). Epidemiology of Vibrio parahaemolyticus Outbreaks, Southern Chile. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 15(2), 163-168. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.071269.
        Email Email this Article
  • Identification of Melioidosis Outbreak by Multilocus Variable Number Tandem Repeat Analysis PDF Version [PDF - 237 KB - 6 pages]
    B. J. Currie et al.
        View Abstract

    Endemic melioidosis is caused by genetically diverse Burkholderia pseudomallei strains. However, clonal outbreaks (multiple cases caused by 1 strain) have occurred, such as from contaminated potable water. B. pseudomallei is designated a group B bioterrorism agent, which necessitates rapidly recognizing point-source outbreaks. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) can identify genetically related isolates, but results take several days to obtain. We developed a simplified 4-locus multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA-4) for rapid typing and compared results with PFGE and MLST for a large number of well-characterized B. pseudomallei isolates. MLVA-4 compared favorably with MLST and PFGE for the same isolates; it discriminated between 65 multilocus sequence types and showed relatedness between epidemiologically linked isolates from outbreak clusters and between isolates from individual patients. MLVA-4 can establish or refute that a clonal outbreak of melioidosis has occurred within 8 hours of receipt of bacterial strains.

        Cite This Article
    EID Currie BJ, Haslem A, Pearson T, Hornstra H, Leadem B, Mayo M, et al. Identification of Melioidosis Outbreak by Multilocus Variable Number Tandem Repeat Analysis. Emerg Infect Dis. 2009;15(2):169-174. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.081036
    AMA Currie BJ, Haslem A, Pearson T, et al. Identification of Melioidosis Outbreak by Multilocus Variable Number Tandem Repeat Analysis. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2009;15(2):169-174. doi:10.3201/eid1502.081036.
    APA Currie, B. J., Haslem, A., Pearson, T., Hornstra, H., Leadem, B., Mayo, M....Keim, P. (2009). Identification of Melioidosis Outbreak by Multilocus Variable Number Tandem Repeat Analysis. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 15(2), 169-174. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.081036.
        Email Email this Article
  • Simian T-Lymphotropic Virus Diversity among Nonhuman Primates, Cameroon PDF Version [PDF - 275 KB - 10 pages]
    D. M. Sintasath et al.
        View Abstract

    Cross-species transmission of retroviruses is common in Cameroon. To determine risk for simian T-cell lymphotropic virus (STLV) transmission from nonhuman primates to hunters, we examined 170 hunter-collected dried blood spots (DBS) from 12 species for STLV. PCR with generic tax and group-specific long terminal repeat primers showed that 12 (7%) specimens from 4 nonhuman primate species were infected with STLV. Phylogenetic analyses showed broad diversity of STLV, including novel STLV-1 and STLV-3 sequences and a highly divergent STLV-3 subtype found in Cercopithecus mona and C. nictitans monkeys. Screening of peripheral blood mononuclear cell DNA from 63 HTLV-seroreactive, PCR-negative hunters did not identify human infections with this divergent STLV-3. Therefore, hunter-collected DBS can effectively capture STLV diversity at the point where pathogen spillover occurs. Broad screening using this relatively easy collection strategy has potential for large-scale monitoring of retrovirus cross-species transmission among highly exposed human populations.

        Cite This Article
    EID Sintasath DM, Wolfe ND, LeBreton M, Jia H, Garcia AD, Diffo JL, et al. Simian T-Lymphotropic Virus Diversity among Nonhuman Primates, Cameroon. Emerg Infect Dis. 2009;15(2):175-184. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080584
    AMA Sintasath DM, Wolfe ND, LeBreton M, et al. Simian T-Lymphotropic Virus Diversity among Nonhuman Primates, Cameroon. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2009;15(2):175-184. doi:10.3201/eid1502.080584.
    APA Sintasath, D. M., Wolfe, N. D., LeBreton, M., Jia, H., Garcia, A. D., Diffo, J. L....Switzer, W. M. (2009). Simian T-Lymphotropic Virus Diversity among Nonhuman Primates, Cameroon. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 15(2), 175-184. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080584.
        Email Email this Article
  • Imported Malaria in Children in Industrialized Countries, 1992–2002 PDF Version [PDF - 215 KB - 7 pages]
    K. Stäger et al.
        View Abstract

    Children account for an appreciable proportion of total imported malaria cases, yet few studies have quantified these cases, identified trends, or suggested evidence-based prevention strategies for this group of travelers. We therefore sought to identify numbers of cases and deaths, Plasmodium species, place of malaria acquisition, preventive measures used, and national origin of malaria in children. We analyzed retrospective data from Australia, Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States and data provided by the United Nations World Tourism Organization. During 1992–2002, >17,000 cases of imported malaria in children were reported in 11 countries where malaria is not endemic; most (>70%) had been acquired in Africa. Returning to country of origin to visit friends and relatives was a risk factor. Malaria prevention for children should be a responsibility of healthcare providers and should be subsidized for low-income travelers to high-risk areas.

        Cite This Article
    EID Stäger K, Legros F, Krause G, Low N, Bradley D, Desai M, et al. Imported Malaria in Children in Industrialized Countries, 1992–2002. Emerg Infect Dis. 2009;15(2):185-191. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080712
    AMA Stäger K, Legros F, Krause G, et al. Imported Malaria in Children in Industrialized Countries, 1992–2002. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2009;15(2):185-191. doi:10.3201/eid1502.080712.
    APA Stäger, K., Legros, F., Krause, G., Low, N., Bradley, D., Desai, M....Schlagenhauf, P. (2009). Imported Malaria in Children in Industrialized Countries, 1992–2002. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 15(2), 185-191. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080712.
        Email Email this Article
  • Severe Dengue Epidemics in Sri Lanka, 2003–2006 PDF Version [PDF - 440 KB - 8 pages]
    N. Kanakaratne et al.
        View Abstract

    Recent emergence of dengue hemorrhagic fever in the Indian subcontinent has been well documented in Sri Lanka. We compare recent (2003–2006) and past (1980–1997) dengue surveillance data for Sri Lanka. The 4 dengue virus (DENV) serotypes have been cocirculating in Sri Lanka for >30 years. Over this period, a new genotype of DENV-1 has replaced an old genotype. Moreover, new clades of DENV-3 genotype III viruses have replaced older clades. Emergence of new clades of DENV-3 in 1989 and 2000 coincided with abrupt increases in the number of reported dengue cases, implicating this serotype in severe epidemics. In 1980–1997, most reported dengue cases were in children. Recent epidemics have been characterized by many cases in children and adults. Changes in local transmission dynamics and genetic changes in DENV-3 are likely increasing emergence of severe dengue epidemics in Sri Lanka.

        Cite This Article
    EID Kanakaratne N, Wahala WM, Messer WB, Tissera HA, Shahani A, Abeysinghe N, et al. Severe Dengue Epidemics in Sri Lanka, 2003–2006. Emerg Infect Dis. 2009;15(2):192-199. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080926
    AMA Kanakaratne N, Wahala WM, Messer WB, et al. Severe Dengue Epidemics in Sri Lanka, 2003–2006. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2009;15(2):192-199. doi:10.3201/eid1502.080926.
    APA Kanakaratne, N., Wahala, W. M., Messer, W. B., Tissera, H. A., Shahani, A., Abeysinghe, N....Gunasekera, M. (2009). Severe Dengue Epidemics in Sri Lanka, 2003–2006. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 15(2), 192-199. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080926.
        Email Email this Article
  • Seoul Virus and Hantavirus Disease, Shenyang, People’s Republic of China PDF Version [PDF - 342 KB - 7 pages]
    Y. Zhang et al.
        View Abstract

    An outbreak of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) occurred among students in Shenyang Pharmaceutical University in 2006. We conducted a study to characterize etiologic agents of the outbreaks and clarify the origin of hantaviruses causing infections in humans and laboratory animals. Immunoglobulin (Ig) M or IgG antibodies against Seoul virus (SEOV) were detected in the serum samples of all 8 patients. IgG antibodies against hantavirus were also identified in laboratory rats, which were used by these students for their scientific research. Phylogenetic analysis showed that partial small segment sequences recovered from humans, laboratory rats, and local wild rats belonged to SEOV. Hantavirus sequences recovered from humans and laboratory rats clustered within 1 of 3 lineages of SEOV circulating among local wild rats in Shenyang. These results suggest that the HFRS outbreak in Shenyang was caused by SEOV that was circulating among local wild rats and had also infected the laboratory rats.

        Cite This Article
    EID Zhang Y, Dong X, Li X, Ma C, Xiong H, Yan G, et al. Seoul Virus and Hantavirus Disease, Shenyang, People’s Republic of China. Emerg Infect Dis. 2009;15(2):200-206. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080291
    AMA Zhang Y, Dong X, Li X, et al. Seoul Virus and Hantavirus Disease, Shenyang, People’s Republic of China. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2009;15(2):200-206. doi:10.3201/eid1502.080291.
    APA Zhang, Y., Dong, X., Li, X., Ma, C., Xiong, H., Yan, G....Plyusnin, A. (2009). Seoul Virus and Hantavirus Disease, Shenyang, People’s Republic of China. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 15(2), 200-206. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080291.
        Email Email this Article
  • Characteristics of 263K Scrapie Agent in Multiple Hamster Species PDF Version [PDF - 629 KB - 9 pages]
    K. D. Meade-White et al.
        View Abstract

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) diseases are known to cross species barriers, but the pathologic and biochemical changes that occur during transmission are not well understood. To better understand these changes, we infected 6 hamster species with 263K hamster scrapie strain and, after each of 3 successive passages in the new species, analyzed abnormal proteinase K (PK)–resistant prion protein (PrPres) glycoform ratios, PrPres PK sensitivity, incubation periods, and lesion profiles. Unique 263K molecular and biochemical profiles evolved in each of the infected hamster species. Characteristics of 263K in the new hamster species seemed to correlate best with host factors rather than agent strain. Furthermore, 2 polymorphic regions of the prion protein amino acid sequence correlated with profile differences in these TSE-infected hamster species.

        Cite This Article
    EID Meade-White KD, Barbian KD, Race B, Favara C, Gardner D, Taubner L, et al. Characteristics of 263K Scrapie Agent in Multiple Hamster Species. Emerg Infect Dis. 2009;15(2):207-215. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.081173
    AMA Meade-White KD, Barbian KD, Race B, et al. Characteristics of 263K Scrapie Agent in Multiple Hamster Species. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2009;15(2):207-215. doi:10.3201/eid1502.081173.
    APA Meade-White, K. D., Barbian, K. D., Race, B., Favara, C., Gardner, D., Taubner, L....Race, R. (2009). Characteristics of 263K Scrapie Agent in Multiple Hamster Species. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 15(2), 207-215. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.081173.
        Email Email this Article
  • Prospective Surveillance of Invasive Group A Streptococcal Disease, Fiji, 2005–2007 PDF Version [PDF - 181 KB - 7 pages]
    A. C. Steer et al.
        View Abstract

    We undertook a prospective active surveillance study of invasive group A streptococcal (GAS) disease in Fiji over a 23-month period, 2005–2007. We identified 64 cases of invasive GAS disease, which represents an average annualized all-ages incidence of 9.9 cases/100,000 population per year (95% confidence interval [CI] 7.6–12.6). Rates were highest in those >65 years of age and in those <5 years, particularly in infants, for whom the incidence was 44.9/100,000 (95% CI 18.1–92.5). The case-fatality rate was 32% and was associated with increasing age and underlying coexisting disease, including diabetes and renal disease. Fifty-five of the GAS isolates underwent emm sequence typing; the types were highly diverse, with 38 different emm subtypes and no particular dominant type. Our data support the view that invasive GAS disease is common in developing countries and deserves increased public health attention.

        Cite This Article
    EID Steer AC, Jenney A, Kado J, Good MF, Batzloff M, Waqatakirewa L, et al. Prospective Surveillance of Invasive Group A Streptococcal Disease, Fiji, 2005–2007. Emerg Infect Dis. 2009;15(2):216-222. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080558
    AMA Steer AC, Jenney A, Kado J, et al. Prospective Surveillance of Invasive Group A Streptococcal Disease, Fiji, 2005–2007. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2009;15(2):216-222. doi:10.3201/eid1502.080558.
    APA Steer, A. C., Jenney, A., Kado, J., Good, M. F., Batzloff, M., Waqatakirewa, L....Carapetis, J. R. (2009). Prospective Surveillance of Invasive Group A Streptococcal Disease, Fiji, 2005–2007. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 15(2), 216-222. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080558.
        Email Email this Article
  • Bacterial Phenotype Variants in Group B Streptococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome PDF Version [PDF - 571 KB - 10 pages]
    P. Sendi et al.
        View Abstract

    We conducted genetic and functional analyses of isolates from a patient with group B streptococcal (GBS) necrotizing fasciitis and toxic shock syndrome. Tissue cultures simultaneously showed colonies with high hemolysis (HH) and low hemolysis (LH). Conversely, the HH and LH variants exhibited low capsule (LC) and high capsule (HC) expression, respectively. Molecular analysis demonstrated that the 2 GBS variants were of the same clonal origin. Genetic analysis found a 3-bp deletion in the covR gene of the HH/LC variant. Functionally, this isolate was associated with an increased growth rate in vitro and with higher interleukin-8 induction. However, in whole blood, opsonophagocytic and intracellular killing assays, the LH/HC phenotype demonstrated higher resistance to host phagocytic killing. In a murine model, LH/HC resulted in higher levels of bacteremia and increased host mortality rate. These findings demonstrate differences in GBS isolates of the same clonal origin but varying phenotypes.

        Cite This Article
    EID Sendi P, Johansson L, Dahesh S, Van Sorge NM, Darenberg J, Norgren M, et al. Bacterial Phenotype Variants in Group B Streptococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome. Emerg Infect Dis. 2009;15(2):223-232. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080990
    AMA Sendi P, Johansson L, Dahesh S, et al. Bacterial Phenotype Variants in Group B Streptococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2009;15(2):223-232. doi:10.3201/eid1502.080990.
    APA Sendi, P., Johansson, L., Dahesh, S., Van Sorge, N. M., Darenberg, J., Norgren, M....Norrby-Teglund, A. (2009). Bacterial Phenotype Variants in Group B Streptococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 15(2), 223-232. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080990.
        Email Email this Article
  • Medscape CME Activity
    Face Mask Use and Control of Respiratory Virus Transmission in Households PDF Version [PDF - 1.44 MB - 10 pages]
    C. MacIntyre et al.
    View Summary

    Mask use is associated with low adherence, but adherent mask users are significantly protected against seasonal disease.

        View Abstract

    Many countries are stockpiling face masks for use as a nonpharmaceutical intervention to control virus transmission during an influenza pandemic. We conducted a prospective cluster-randomized trial comparing surgical masks, non–fit-tested P2 masks, and no masks in prevention of influenza-like illness (ILI) in households. Mask use adherence was self-reported. During the 2006 and 2007 winter seasons, 286 exposed adults from 143 households who had been exposed to a child with clinical respiratory illness were recruited. We found that adherence to mask use significantly reduced the risk for ILI-associated infection, but <50% of participants wore masks most of the time. We concluded that household use of face masks is associated with low adherence and is ineffective for controlling seasonal respiratory disease. However, during a severe pandemic when use of face masks might be greater, pandemic transmission in households could be reduced.
Many countries are stockpiling face masks for use as nonpharmaceutical interventions to reduce viral transmission during an influenza pandemic. We conducted a prospective cluster-randomized trial comparing surgical masks, non–fit-tested P2 masks, and no masks in prevention of influenza-like illness (ILI) in households. During the 2006 and 2007 winter seasons, 286 exposed adults from 143 households who had been exposed to a child with clinical respiratory illness were recruited. Intent-to-treat analysis showed no significant difference in the relative risk of ILI in the mask use groups compared with the control group; however, <50% of those in the mask use groups reported wearing masks most of the time. Adherence to mask use was associated with a significantly reduced risk of ILI-associated infection. We concluded that household use of masks is associated with low adherence and is ineffective in controlling seasonal ILI. If adherence were greater, mask use might reduce transmission during a severe influenza pandemic.

        Cite This Article
    EID MacIntyre C, Cauchemez S, Dwyer DE, Seale H, Cheung P, Browne G, et al. Face Mask Use and Control of Respiratory Virus Transmission in Households. Emerg Infect Dis. 2009;15(2):233-241. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.081167
    AMA MacIntyre C, Cauchemez S, Dwyer DE, et al. Face Mask Use and Control of Respiratory Virus Transmission in Households. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2009;15(2):233-241. doi:10.3201/eid1502.081167.
    APA MacIntyre, C., Cauchemez, S., Dwyer, D. E., Seale, H., Cheung, P., Browne, G....Ferguson, N. (2009). Face Mask Use and Control of Respiratory Virus Transmission in Households. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 15(2), 233-241. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.081167.
        Email Email this Article
  • Nontuberculous Mycobacteria, Zambia PDF Version [PDF - 250 KB - 9 pages]
    P. C. Buijtels et al.
        View Abstract

    Clinical relevance of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) isolated from 180 chronically ill patients and 385 healthy controls in Zambia was evaluated to examine the contribution of these isolates to tuberculosis (TB)–like disease. The proportion of NTM-positive sputum samples was significantly higher in the patient group than in controls; 11% and 6%, respectively (p<0.05). NTM-associated lung disease was diagnosed for 1 patient, and a probable diagnosis was made for 3 patients. NTM-positive patients and controls were more likely to report vomiting and diarrhea and were more frequently underweight than the NTM-negative patients and controls. Chest radiographs of NTM-positive patients showed deviations consistent with TB more frequently than those of controls. The most frequently isolated NTM was Mycobacterium avium complex. Multiple, not previously identified mycobacteria (55 of 171 NTM) were isolated from both groups. NTM probably play an important role in the etiology of TB-like diseases in Zambia.

        Cite This Article
    EID Buijtels PC, van der Sande MA, de Graaff CS, Parkinson S, Verbrugh HA, Petit PL, et al. Nontuberculous Mycobacteria, Zambia. Emerg Infect Dis. 2009;15(2):242-249. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080006
    AMA Buijtels PC, van der Sande MA, de Graaff CS, et al. Nontuberculous Mycobacteria, Zambia. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2009;15(2):242-249. doi:10.3201/eid1502.080006.
    APA Buijtels, P. C., van der Sande, M. A., de Graaff, C. S., Parkinson, S., Verbrugh, H. A., Petit, P. L....van Soolingen, D. (2009). Nontuberculous Mycobacteria, Zambia. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 15(2), 242-249. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080006.
        Email Email this Article
  • Methicillin-Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus in Skin and Soft Tissue Infections, Northern Italy PDF Version [PDF - 176 KB - 8 pages]
    M. Tinelli et al.
        View Abstract

    During February 2004–September 2006, familial clusters and sporadic cases of Staphylococcus aureus skin and soft tissue infections were observed in a suburban area near Milan in northern Italy. Molecular typing of the isolates showed an epidemic methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) strain, spa type 005 and sequence type 22 that harbored Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) genes. The first case-patients were neonates or mothers who had recently delivered in the local hospital. Examination of the medical records showed a cluster of postpartum mastitis and neonatal skin infections antedating the emergence of infections in the community. Nasal swabs of neonates, mothers, and hospital staff were positive for the epidemic MSSA. Hospital circulation of the strain was interrupted by implementation of infection control measures, although infections continued to occur in the community. The PVL-positive MSSA strain resembles typical community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus in its ability to cause prolonged community and hospital outbreaks of skin infections.

        Cite This Article
    EID Tinelli M, Monaco M, Vimercati M, Ceraminiello A, Pantosti A. Methicillin-Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus in Skin and Soft Tissue Infections, Northern Italy. Emerg Infect Dis. 2009;15(2):250-257. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080010
    AMA Tinelli M, Monaco M, Vimercati M, et al. Methicillin-Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus in Skin and Soft Tissue Infections, Northern Italy. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2009;15(2):250-257. doi:10.3201/eid1502.080010.
    APA Tinelli, M., Monaco, M., Vimercati, M., Ceraminiello, A., & Pantosti, A. (2009). Methicillin-Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus in Skin and Soft Tissue Infections, Northern Italy. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 15(2), 250-257. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080010.
        Email Email this Article
  • Causes of Death in HIV-infected Persons Who Have Tuberculosis, Thailand PDF Version [PDF - 162 KB - 7 pages]
    K. P. Cain et al.
        View Abstract

    Up to 50% of persons with HIV and a diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) in Thailand die during TB treatment. In a prospective observational study, a team of physicians ascribed the cause of death after reviewing verbal autopsies (interviews of family members about events preceding death), laboratory data, and medical records. Of 849 HIV-infected TB patients enrolled, 142 (17%) died. The cause of death was TB for 38 (27%), including 6 with multidrug-resistant TB and 20 with disseminated TB; an HIV-associated condition other than TB for 50 (35%); and a condition unrelated to TB or HIV for 22 (15%). Twenty-three patients (16%) were judged not to have had TB at all. Death from all causes except those unrelated to TB or HIV was less common in persons receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). In addition to increasing the use of ART, death rates may be reduced through expanded use of modern TB diagnostic techniques.

        Cite This Article
    EID Cain KP, Anekthananon T, Burapat C, Akksilp S, Mankhatitham W, Srinak C, et al. Causes of Death in HIV-infected Persons Who Have Tuberculosis, Thailand. Emerg Infect Dis. 2009;15(2):258-264. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080942
    AMA Cain KP, Anekthananon T, Burapat C, et al. Causes of Death in HIV-infected Persons Who Have Tuberculosis, Thailand. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2009;15(2):258-264. doi:10.3201/eid1502.080942.
    APA Cain, K. P., Anekthananon, T., Burapat, C., Akksilp, S., Mankhatitham, W., Srinak, C....Varma, J. K. (2009). Causes of Death in HIV-infected Persons Who Have Tuberculosis, Thailand. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 15(2), 258-264. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080942.
        Email Email this Article
  • Medical Procedures and Risk for Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease, Japan, 1999–2008 PDF Version [PDF - 228 KB - 7 pages]
    T. Hamaguchi et al.
        View Abstract

    To elucidate the association between medical procedures and sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), we analyzed medical procedures (any surgical procedure, neurosurgery, ophthalmic surgery, and blood transfusion) for patients registered by the CJD Surveillance Committee in Japan during 1999–2008. We conducted an age-stratified case–control study with 753 sCJD patients and 210 controls and a study of patients who underwent neurosurgical or ophthalmic surgical procedures at the same hospital. Although the control group was relatively small, no evidence was found that prion disease was transmitted through the investigated medical procedures before onset of sCJD. After onset of sCJD, 4.5% of the sCJD patients underwent operations, including neurosurgical for 0.8% and ophthalmic for 1.9%; no special precautions against transmission of prion diseases were taken. Fortunately, we have not identified patients with prion disease attributed to these operations. Our findings indicate that surgical procedures or blood transfusion had little effect on the incidence of sCJD.

        Cite This Article
    EID Hamaguchi T, Noguchi-Shinohara M, Nozaki I, Nakamura Y, Sato T, Kitamoto T, et al. Medical Procedures and Risk for Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease, Japan, 1999–2008. Emerg Infect Dis. 2009;15(2):265-271. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080749
    AMA Hamaguchi T, Noguchi-Shinohara M, Nozaki I, et al. Medical Procedures and Risk for Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease, Japan, 1999–2008. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2009;15(2):265-271. doi:10.3201/eid1502.080749.
    APA Hamaguchi, T., Noguchi-Shinohara, M., Nozaki, I., Nakamura, Y., Sato, T., Kitamoto, T....Yamada, M. (2009). Medical Procedures and Risk for Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease, Japan, 1999–2008. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 15(2), 265-271. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080749.
        Email Email this Article
  • Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus (H5N1) in Frozen Duck Carcasses, Germany, 2007 PDF Version [PDF - 391 KB - 8 pages]
    T. C. Harder et al.
        View Abstract

    We conducted phylogenetic and epidemiologic analyses to determine sources of outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV), subtype H5N1, in poultry holdings in 2007 in Germany, and a suspected incursion of HPAIV into the food chain through contaminated deep-frozen duck carcasses. In summer 2007, HPAIV (H5N1) outbreaks in 3 poultry holdings in Germany were temporally, spatially, and phylogenetically linked to outbreaks in wild aquatic birds. Detection of HPAIV (H5N1) in frozen duck carcass samples of retained slaughter batches of 1 farm indicated that silent infection had occurred for some time before the incidental detection. Phylogenetic analysis established a direct epidemiologic link between HPAIV isolated from duck meat and strains isolated from 3 further outbreaks in December 2007 in backyard chickens that had access to uncooked offal from commercial deep-frozen duck carcasses. Measures that will prevent such undetected introduction of HPAIV (H5N1) into the food chain are urgently required.

        Cite This Article
    EID Harder TC, Teuffert J, Starick E, Gethmann J, Grund C, Fereidouni S, et al. Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus (H5N1) in Frozen Duck Carcasses, Germany, 2007. Emerg Infect Dis. 2009;15(2):272-279. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080949
    AMA Harder TC, Teuffert J, Starick E, et al. Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus (H5N1) in Frozen Duck Carcasses, Germany, 2007. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2009;15(2):272-279. doi:10.3201/eid1502.080949.
    APA Harder, T. C., Teuffert, J., Starick, E., Gethmann, J., Grund, C., Fereidouni, S....Beer, M. (2009). Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus (H5N1) in Frozen Duck Carcasses, Germany, 2007. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 15(2), 272-279. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080949.
        Email Email this Article

Dispatches

  • European Bat Lyssavirus Transmission among Cats, Europe PDF Version [PDF - 380 KB - 5 pages]
    L. Dacheux et al.
        View Abstract

    We identified 2 cases of European bat lyssavirus subtype 1 transmission to domestic carnivores (cats) in France. Bat-to-cat transmission is suspected. Low amounts of virus antigen in cat brain made diagnosis difficult.

        Cite This Article
    EID Dacheux L, Larrous F, Mailles A, Boisseleau D, Delmas O, Biron C, et al. European Bat Lyssavirus Transmission among Cats, Europe. Emerg Infect Dis. 2009;15(2):280-284. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080637
    AMA Dacheux L, Larrous F, Mailles A, et al. European Bat Lyssavirus Transmission among Cats, Europe. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2009;15(2):280-284. doi:10.3201/eid1502.080637.
    APA Dacheux, L., Larrous, F., Mailles, A., Boisseleau, D., Delmas, O., Biron, C....Bourhy, H. (2009). European Bat Lyssavirus Transmission among Cats, Europe. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 15(2), 280-284. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080637.
        Email Email this Article
  • Staphylococcus aureus ST398, New York City and Dominican Republic PDF Version [PDF - 165 KB - 3 pages]
    M. Bhat et al.
        View Abstract

    Closely related Staphylococcus aureus strains of ST398, an animal-associated strain, were identified in samples collected from humans in northern Manhattan, New York, NY, USA, and in the Dominican Republic. A large population in northern Manhattan has close ties to the Dominican Republic, suggesting international transmission.

        Cite This Article
    EID Bhat M, Dumortier C, Taylor BS, Miller M, Vasquez G, Yunen J, et al. Staphylococcus aureus ST398, New York City and Dominican Republic. Emerg Infect Dis. 2009;15(2):285-287. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080609
    AMA Bhat M, Dumortier C, Taylor BS, et al. Staphylococcus aureus ST398, New York City and Dominican Republic. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2009;15(2):285-287. doi:10.3201/eid1502.080609.
    APA Bhat, M., Dumortier, C., Taylor, B. S., Miller, M., Vasquez, G., Yunen, J....Lowy, F. D. (2009). Staphylococcus aureus ST398, New York City and Dominican Republic. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 15(2), 285-287. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080609.
        Email Email this Article
  • Genomic Characterization of Novel Human Parechovirus Type PDF Version [PDF - 263 KB - 4 pages]
    L. Li et al.
        View Abstract

    Using a simple metagenomic approach, we identified a divergent human parechovirus (HPeV) in the stool of a child in Pakistan. Genomic characterization showed this virus was distinct enough from reported HPeV types to qualify as candidate prototype for the seventh HPeV type.

        Cite This Article
    EID Li L, Victoria J, Kapoor A, Naeem A, Shaukat S, Sharif S, et al. Genomic Characterization of Novel Human Parechovirus Type. Emerg Infect Dis. 2009;15(2):288-291. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080341
    AMA Li L, Victoria J, Kapoor A, et al. Genomic Characterization of Novel Human Parechovirus Type. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2009;15(2):288-291. doi:10.3201/eid1502.080341.
    APA Li, L., Victoria, J., Kapoor, A., Naeem, A., Shaukat, S., Sharif, S....Delwart, E. (2009). Genomic Characterization of Novel Human Parechovirus Type. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 15(2), 288-291. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080341.
        Email Email this Article
  • Clinical Relevance of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria, Oman PDF Version [PDF - 125 KB - 3 pages]
    S. H. Al-Mahruqi et al.
        View Abstract

    Little is known about the clinical relevance of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in the Arabian Peninsula. We assessed the prevalence and studied a random sample of isolates at a reference laboratory in Muscat, Oman. NTM cause disease in this region, and their prevalence has increased.

        Cite This Article
    EID Al-Mahruqi SH, van Ingen J, Al-Busaidy S, Boeree MJ, Al-Zadjali S, Patel A, et al. Clinical Relevance of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria, Oman. Emerg Infect Dis. 2009;15(2):292-294. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080977
    AMA Al-Mahruqi SH, van Ingen J, Al-Busaidy S, et al. Clinical Relevance of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria, Oman. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2009;15(2):292-294. doi:10.3201/eid1502.080977.
    APA Al-Mahruqi, S. H., van Ingen, J., Al-Busaidy, S., Boeree, M. J., Al-Zadjali, S., Patel, A....van Soolingen, D. (2009). Clinical Relevance of Nontuberculous Mycobacteria, Oman. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 15(2), 292-294. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080977.
        Email Email this Article
  • Enteroviruses in Patients with Acute Encephalitis, Uttar Pradesh, India PDF Version [PDF - 167 KB - 4 pages]
    G. N. Sapkal et al.
        View Abstract

    An outbreak of viral encephalitis occurred in northern India in 2006. Attempts to identify an etiologic agent in cerebrospinal fluid by using reverse transcription–PCR showed positivity to enterovirus (EV) in 66 (21.6%) of 306 patients. Sequencing and phylogenetic analyses of PCR products from 59 (89.3%) of 66 specimens showed similarity with EV-89 and EV-76 sequences.

        Cite This Article
    EID Sapkal GN, Bondre VP, Fulmali PV, Patil P, Dadhania V, Ayachit VM, et al. Enteroviruses in Patients with Acute Encephalitis, Uttar Pradesh, India. Emerg Infect Dis. 2009;15(2):295-298. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080865
    AMA Sapkal GN, Bondre VP, Fulmali PV, et al. Enteroviruses in Patients with Acute Encephalitis, Uttar Pradesh, India. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2009;15(2):295-298. doi:10.3201/eid1502.080865.
    APA Sapkal, G. N., Bondre, V. P., Fulmali, P. V., Patil, P., Dadhania, V., Ayachit, V. M....Gore, M. M. (2009). Enteroviruses in Patients with Acute Encephalitis, Uttar Pradesh, India. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 15(2), 295-298. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080865.
        Email Email this Article
  • Peste des Petits Ruminants Virus in Tibet, China PDF Version [PDF - 203 KB - 3 pages]
    Z. Wang et al.
        View Abstract

    Serologic and molecular evidence indicates that peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) infection has emerged in goats and sheep in the Ngari region of southwestern Tibet, People’s Republic of China. Phylogenetic analysis confirms that the PPRV strain from Tibet is classified as lineage 4 and is closely related to viruses currently circulating in neighboring countries of southern Asia.

        Cite This Article
    EID Wang Z, Bao J, Wu X, Liu Y, Li L, Liu C, et al. Peste des Petits Ruminants Virus in Tibet, China. Emerg Infect Dis. 2009;15(2):299-301. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080817
    AMA Wang Z, Bao J, Wu X, et al. Peste des Petits Ruminants Virus in Tibet, China. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2009;15(2):299-301. doi:10.3201/eid1502.080817.
    APA Wang, Z., Bao, J., Wu, X., Liu, Y., Li, L., Liu, C....Wang, J. (2009). Peste des Petits Ruminants Virus in Tibet, China. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 15(2), 299-301. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080817.
        Email Email this Article
  • Mycobacterium bolletii Respiratory Infections PDF Version [PDF - 269 KB - 4 pages]
    T. Adékambi and M. Drancourt
        View Abstract

    Contrary to other species in the Mycobacterium chelonae-abscessus complex, we reidentified M. bolletii strains isolated from 4 respiratory patients and found these strains to be uniformly resistant to clarithromycin. No mutations previously associated with macrolide resistance in bacteria were detected in either the 23S rDNA or the genes encoding riboproteins L4 and L22.

        Cite This Article
    EID Adékambi T, Drancourt M. Mycobacterium bolletii Respiratory Infections. Emerg Infect Dis. 2009;15(2):302-305. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080837
    AMA Adékambi T, Drancourt M. Mycobacterium bolletii Respiratory Infections. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2009;15(2):302-305. doi:10.3201/eid1502.080837.
    APA Adékambi, T., & Drancourt, M. (2009). Mycobacterium bolletii Respiratory Infections. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 15(2), 302-305. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080837.
        Email Email this Article
  • Tahyna Virus and Human Infection, China PDF Version [PDF - 283 KB - 4 pages]
    Z. Lu et al.
        View Abstract

    In 2006, Tahyna virus was isolated from Culex spp. mosquitoes collected in Xinjiang, People’s Republic of China. In 2007, to determine whether this virus was infecting humans, we tested serum from febrile patients. We found immunoglobulin (Ig) M and IgG against the virus, which suggests human infection in this region.

        Cite This Article
    EID Lu Z, Lu X, Fu S, Zhang S, Li Z, Yao X, et al. Tahyna Virus and Human Infection, China. Emerg Infect Dis. 2009;15(2):306-309. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080722
    AMA Lu Z, Lu X, Fu S, et al. Tahyna Virus and Human Infection, China. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2009;15(2):306-309. doi:10.3201/eid1502.080722.
    APA Lu, Z., Lu, X., Fu, S., Zhang, S., Li, Z., Yao, X....Liang, G. (2009). Tahyna Virus and Human Infection, China. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 15(2), 306-309. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080722.
        Email Email this Article
  • Novel Human Parechovirus from Brazil PDF Version [PDF - 434 KB - 4 pages]
    J. Drexler et al.
        View Abstract

    Human parechoviruses (HPeVs) were detected by reverse transcription–PCR in 16.1% of 335 stool samples from children <6 years of age with enteritis in Salvador, Brazil. Whole genome sequencing of 1 sample showed a novel HPeV that has been designated as HPeV8.

        Cite This Article
    EID Drexler J, Grywna K, Stöcker A, Almeida PS, Ribeiro TC, Eschbach-Bludau M, et al. Novel Human Parechovirus from Brazil. Emerg Infect Dis. 2009;15(2):310-313. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.081028
    AMA Drexler J, Grywna K, Stöcker A, et al. Novel Human Parechovirus from Brazil. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2009;15(2):310-313. doi:10.3201/eid1502.081028.
    APA Drexler, J., Grywna, K., Stöcker, A., Almeida, P. S., Ribeiro, T. C., Eschbach-Bludau, M....Park, S. (2009). Novel Human Parechovirus from Brazil. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 15(2), 310-313. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.081028.
        Email Email this Article
  • Reemergence of Human and Animal Brucellosis, Bulgaria PDF Version [PDF - 212 KB - 3 pages]
    G. Russo et al.
        View Abstract

    Bulgaria had been free from brucellosis since 1958, but during 2005–2007, a reemergence of human and animal disease was recorded. The reemergence of this zoonosis in the country highlights the importance of maintaining an active surveillance system for infectious diseases that will require full cooperation between public health and veterinary authorities.

        Cite This Article
    EID Russo G, Pasquali P, Nenova R, Alexandrov T, Ralchev S, Vullo V, et al. Reemergence of Human and Animal Brucellosis, Bulgaria. Emerg Infect Dis. 2009;15(2):314-316. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.081025
    AMA Russo G, Pasquali P, Nenova R, et al. Reemergence of Human and Animal Brucellosis, Bulgaria. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2009;15(2):314-316. doi:10.3201/eid1502.081025.
    APA Russo, G., Pasquali, P., Nenova, R., Alexandrov, T., Ralchev, S., Vullo, V....Kantardjiev, T. (2009). Reemergence of Human and Animal Brucellosis, Bulgaria. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 15(2), 314-316. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.081025.
        Email Email this Article
  • Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease in Cattle, Western Turkey PDF Version [PDF - 238 KB - 3 pages]
    E. M. Temizel et al.
        View Abstract

    In 2007, an outbreak of epizootic hemorrhagic disease (EHD) occurred in Turkey. On the basis of clinical investigation, 41 cattle were suspected to have EHD. Reverse transcription–PCR and sequence analyses indicated that the virus belonged to EHD virus serotype 6, thus confirming EHD virus infection of cattle in Turkey.

        Cite This Article
    EID Temizel EM, Yesilbag K, Batten C, Senturk S, Maan NS, Mertens PP, et al. Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease in Cattle, Western Turkey. Emerg Infect Dis. 2009;15(2):317-319. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080572
    AMA Temizel EM, Yesilbag K, Batten C, et al. Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease in Cattle, Western Turkey. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2009;15(2):317-319. doi:10.3201/eid1502.080572.
    APA Temizel, E. M., Yesilbag, K., Batten, C., Senturk, S., Maan, N. S., Mertens, P. P....Batmaz, H. (2009). Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease in Cattle, Western Turkey. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 15(2), 317-319. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080572.
        Email Email this Article
  • Natural Transmission of Zoonotic Babesia spp. by Ixodes ricinus Ticks PDF Version [PDF - 229 KB - 3 pages]
    C. A. Becker et al.
        View Abstract

    To determine characteristics of natural transmission of Babesia sp. EU1 and B. divergens by adult Ixodes ricinus ticks, we examined tick salivary gland contents. We found that I. ricinus is a competent vector for EU1 and that their sporozoites directly invade erythrocytes. We conclude that EU1 is naturally transmitted by I. ricinus.

        Cite This Article
    EID Becker CA, Bouju-Albert A, Jouglin M, Chauvin A, Malandrin L. Natural Transmission of Zoonotic Babesia spp. by Ixodes ricinus Ticks. Emerg Infect Dis. 2009;15(2):320-322. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.081247
    AMA Becker CA, Bouju-Albert A, Jouglin M, et al. Natural Transmission of Zoonotic Babesia spp. by Ixodes ricinus Ticks. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2009;15(2):320-322. doi:10.3201/eid1502.081247.
    APA Becker, C. A., Bouju-Albert, A., Jouglin, M., Chauvin, A., & Malandrin, L. (2009). Natural Transmission of Zoonotic Babesia spp. by Ixodes ricinus Ticks. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 15(2), 320-322. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.081247.
        Email Email this Article
  • Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis and Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Child PDF Version [PDF - 388 KB - 3 pages]
    S. Vilcarromero et al.
        View Abstract

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) is reemerging in Peru. VEE virus subtype ID in Peru has not been previously associated with severe disease manifestations. In 2006, VEE virus subtype ID was isolated from a boy with severe febrile disease and gastrointestinal bleeding; the strain contained 2 mutations within the PE2 region.

        Cite This Article
    EID Vilcarromero S, Laguna-Torres A, Fernández C, Gotuzzo E, Suárez L, Céspedes M, et al. Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis and Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Child. Emerg Infect Dis. 2009;15(2):323-325. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.081018
    AMA Vilcarromero S, Laguna-Torres A, Fernández C, et al. Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis and Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Child. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2009;15(2):323-325. doi:10.3201/eid1502.081018.
    APA Vilcarromero, S., Laguna-Torres, A., Fernández, C., Gotuzzo, E., Suárez, L., Céspedes, M....Kochel, T. J. (2009). Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis and Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Child. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 15(2), 323-325. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.081018.
        Email Email this Article
  • Isolation of Kyasanur Forest Disease Virus from Febrile Patient, Yunnan, China
    J. Wang et al.
        View Abstract

    We recently determined that Nanjianyin virus, isolated from serum of a patient in Yunnan Province, China, in 1989, is a type of Kyasanur Forest disease virus. Results of a 1987–1990 seroepidemiologic investigation in Yunnan Province had shown that residents of the Hengduan Mountain region had been infected with Nanjianyin virus.

        Cite This Article
    EID Wang J, Zhang H, Fu S, Wang H, Ni D, Nasci RS, et al. Isolation of Kyasanur Forest Disease Virus from Febrile Patient, Yunnan, China. Emerg Infect Dis. 2009;15(2):326-328. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080979
    AMA Wang J, Zhang H, Fu S, et al. Isolation of Kyasanur Forest Disease Virus from Febrile Patient, Yunnan, China. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2009;15(2):326-328. doi:10.3201/eid1502.080979.
    APA Wang, J., Zhang, H., Fu, S., Wang, H., Ni, D., Nasci, R. S....Liang, G. (2009). Isolation of Kyasanur Forest Disease Virus from Febrile Patient, Yunnan, China. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 15(2), 326-328. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080979.
        Email Email this Article
  • Chikungunya Virus and Central Nervous System Infections in Children, India PDF Version [PDF - 172 KB - 3 pages]
    P. Lewthwaite et al.
        View Abstract

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne alphavirus best known for causing fever, rash, arthralgia, and occasional neurologic disease. By using real-time reverse transcription–PCR, we detected CHIKV in plasma samples of 8 (14%) of 58 children with suspected central nervous system infection in Bellary, India. CHIKV was also detected in the cerebrospinal fluid of 3 children.

        Cite This Article
    EID Lewthwaite P, Vasanthapuram R, Osborne JC, Begum A, Plank JL, Shankar MV, et al. Chikungunya Virus and Central Nervous System Infections in Children, India. Emerg Infect Dis. 2009;15(2):329-331. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080902
    AMA Lewthwaite P, Vasanthapuram R, Osborne JC, et al. Chikungunya Virus and Central Nervous System Infections in Children, India. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2009;15(2):329-331. doi:10.3201/eid1502.080902.
    APA Lewthwaite, P., Vasanthapuram, R., Osborne, J. C., Begum, A., Plank, J. L., Shankar, M. V....Solomon, T. (2009). Chikungunya Virus and Central Nervous System Infections in Children, India. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 15(2), 329-331. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080902.
        Email Email this Article
  • Effect of Free Treatment and Surveillance on HIV-Infected Persons Who Have Tuberculosis, Taiwan, 1993–2006 PDF Version [PDF - 234 KB - 3 pages]
    S. Tseng et al.
        View Abstract

    In 1997, Taiwan made highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) available without cost to HIV-infected persons; in 2001, a national web-based surveillance system was implemented. Healthcare workers use the system to monitor patients' conditions and can intervene when necessary. Free HAART, coupled with the surveillance system, appears to have increased survival rates of HIV-infected persons with tuberculosis in Taiwan.

        Cite This Article
    EID Tseng S, Jiang DD, Hoi H, Lo H, Hwang K. Effect of Free Treatment and Surveillance on HIV-Infected Persons Who Have Tuberculosis, Taiwan, 1993–2006. Emerg Infect Dis. 2009;15(2):332-334. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.081000
    AMA Tseng S, Jiang DD, Hoi H, et al. Effect of Free Treatment and Surveillance on HIV-Infected Persons Who Have Tuberculosis, Taiwan, 1993–2006. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2009;15(2):332-334. doi:10.3201/eid1502.081000.
    APA Tseng, S., Jiang, D. D., Hoi, H., Lo, H., & Hwang, K. (2009). Effect of Free Treatment and Surveillance on HIV-Infected Persons Who Have Tuberculosis, Taiwan, 1993–2006. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 15(2), 332-334. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.081000.
        Email Email this Article
  • Vaccine-induced Immunity Circumvented by Typical Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing Strains PDF Version [PDF - 278 KB - 5 pages]
    K. Kremer et al.
        View Abstract

    The frequency of typical and atypical Beijing strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was determined in the Netherlands; Vietnam; and Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, People’s Republic of China. The strains’ associations with drug resistance, M. bovis BCG vaccination, and patient characteristics were assessed. BCG vaccination may have positively selected the prevalent typical Beijing strains.

        Cite This Article
    EID Kremer K, van der Werf MJ, Au BK, Anh DD, Kam KM, Rogier van Doorn H, et al. Vaccine-induced Immunity Circumvented by Typical Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing Strains. Emerg Infect Dis. 2009;15(2):335-339. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080795
    AMA Kremer K, van der Werf MJ, Au BK, et al. Vaccine-induced Immunity Circumvented by Typical Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing Strains. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2009;15(2):335-339. doi:10.3201/eid1502.080795.
    APA Kremer, K., van der Werf, M. J., Au, B. K., Anh, D. D., Kam, K. M., Rogier van Doorn, H....van Soolingen, D. (2009). Vaccine-induced Immunity Circumvented by Typical Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing Strains. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 15(2), 335-339. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080795.
        Email Email this Article
  • Serogroup W135 Meningococcal Meningitis, Northern Cameroon, 2007–2008 PDF Version [PDF - 154 KB - 3 pages]
    D. Massenet et al.
        View Abstract

    We analyzed results of recent microbiologic surveillance of meningitis in northern Cameroon. During the 2007 and 2008 meningitis seasons, all 57 identified meningococcal isolates were serogroup W135. This situation might indicate that the area is experiencing a period between epidemic waves due to 2 different clones of serogroup A meningococci.

        Cite This Article
    EID Massenet D, Inrombe J, Mevoula D, Nicolas P. Serogroup W135 Meningococcal Meningitis, Northern Cameroon, 2007–2008. Emerg Infect Dis. 2009;15(2):340-342. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080988
    AMA Massenet D, Inrombe J, Mevoula D, et al. Serogroup W135 Meningococcal Meningitis, Northern Cameroon, 2007–2008. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2009;15(2):340-342. doi:10.3201/eid1502.080988.
    APA Massenet, D., Inrombe, J., Mevoula, D., & Nicolas, P. (2009). Serogroup W135 Meningococcal Meningitis, Northern Cameroon, 2007–2008. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 15(2), 340-342. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080988.
        Email Email this Article

Letters

  • Clostridium difficile–associated Disease in the Elderly, United States PDF Version [PDF - 84 KB - 2 pages]
    J. Jagai and E. Naumova
            Cite This Article
    EID Jagai J, Naumova E. Clostridium difficile–associated Disease in the Elderly, United States. Emerg Infect Dis. 2009;15(2):343-344. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080785
    AMA Jagai J, Naumova E. Clostridium difficile–associated Disease in the Elderly, United States. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2009;15(2):343-344. doi:10.3201/eid1502.080785.
    APA Jagai, J., & Naumova, E. (2009). Clostridium difficile–associated Disease in the Elderly, United States. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 15(2), 343-344. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080785.
        Email Email this Article
  • Viral Etiology of Common Cold in Children, Finland PDF Version [PDF - 105 KB - 3 pages]
    A. Ruohola et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Ruohola A, Waris M, Allander T, Ziegler T, Heikkinen T, Ruuskanen O, et al. Viral Etiology of Common Cold in Children, Finland. Emerg Infect Dis. 2009;15(2):344-346. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.081468
    AMA Ruohola A, Waris M, Allander T, et al. Viral Etiology of Common Cold in Children, Finland. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2009;15(2):344-346. doi:10.3201/eid1502.081468.
    APA Ruohola, A., Waris, M., Allander, T., Ziegler, T., Heikkinen, T., & Ruuskanen, O. (2009). Viral Etiology of Common Cold in Children, Finland. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 15(2), 344-346. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.081468.
        Email Email this Article
  • Time from Illness Onset to Death, 1918 Influenza and Pneumococcal Pneumonia PDF Version [PDF - 100 KB - 2 pages]
    K. P. Klugman et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Klugman KP, Astley CM, Lipsitch M. Time from Illness Onset to Death, 1918 Influenza and Pneumococcal Pneumonia. Emerg Infect Dis. 2009;15(2):346-347. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.081208
    AMA Klugman KP, Astley CM, Lipsitch M. Time from Illness Onset to Death, 1918 Influenza and Pneumococcal Pneumonia. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2009;15(2):346-347. doi:10.3201/eid1502.081208.
    APA Klugman, K. P., Astley, C. M., & Lipsitch, M. (2009). Time from Illness Onset to Death, 1918 Influenza and Pneumococcal Pneumonia. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 15(2), 346-347. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.081208.
        Email Email this Article
  • Unusual Manifestation of Toscana Virus Infection, Spain PDF Version [PDF - 81 KB - 2 pages]
    S. Sanbonmatsu-Gámez et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Sanbonmatsu-Gámez S, Pérez-Ruiz M, Palop-Borrás B, Navarro-Marí JM. Unusual Manifestation of Toscana Virus Infection, Spain. Emerg Infect Dis. 2009;15(2):347-348. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.081001
    AMA Sanbonmatsu-Gámez S, Pérez-Ruiz M, Palop-Borrás B, et al. Unusual Manifestation of Toscana Virus Infection, Spain. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2009;15(2):347-348. doi:10.3201/eid1502.081001.
    APA Sanbonmatsu-Gámez, S., Pérez-Ruiz, M., Palop-Borrás, B., & Navarro-Marí, J. M. (2009). Unusual Manifestation of Toscana Virus Infection, Spain. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 15(2), 347-348. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.081001.
        Email Email this Article
  • Sporadic Oropouche Infection, Acre, Brazil PDF Version [PDF - 99 KB - 3 pages]
    A. C. Terzian et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Terzian AC, Bronzoni RV, Drumond BP, Da Silva-Nunes M, Santos da Silva N, Ferreira MU, et al. Sporadic Oropouche Infection, Acre, Brazil. Emerg Infect Dis. 2009;15(2):348-350. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080401
    AMA Terzian AC, Bronzoni RV, Drumond BP, et al. Sporadic Oropouche Infection, Acre, Brazil. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2009;15(2):348-350. doi:10.3201/eid1502.080401.
    APA Terzian, A. C., Bronzoni, R. V., Drumond, B. P., Da Silva-Nunes, M., Santos da Silva, N., Ferreira, M. U....Nogueira, M. L. (2009). Sporadic Oropouche Infection, Acre, Brazil. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 15(2), 348-350. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080401.
        Email Email this Article
  • Meningitis Caused by Streptococcus suis Serotype 14, North America PDF Version [PDF - 102 KB - 3 pages]
    A. Haleis et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Haleis A, Alfa M, Gottschalk M, Bernard K, Ronald A, Manickam K, et al. Meningitis Caused by Streptococcus suis Serotype 14, North America. Emerg Infect Dis. 2009;15(2):350-352. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080842
    AMA Haleis A, Alfa M, Gottschalk M, et al. Meningitis Caused by Streptococcus suis Serotype 14, North America. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2009;15(2):350-352. doi:10.3201/eid1502.080842.
    APA Haleis, A., Alfa, M., Gottschalk, M., Bernard, K., Ronald, A., & Manickam, K. (2009). Meningitis Caused by Streptococcus suis Serotype 14, North America. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 15(2), 350-352. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080842.
        Email Email this Article
  • Outbreaks Caused by New Variants of Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor, India PDF Version [PDF - 98 KB - 3 pages]
    N. Taneja et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Taneja N, Mishra A, Sangar G, Singh G, Sharma M. Outbreaks Caused by New Variants of Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor, India. Emerg Infect Dis. 2009;15(2):352-354. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080943
    AMA Taneja N, Mishra A, Sangar G, et al. Outbreaks Caused by New Variants of Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor, India. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2009;15(2):352-354. doi:10.3201/eid1502.080943.
    APA Taneja, N., Mishra, A., Sangar, G., Singh, G., & Sharma, M. (2009). Outbreaks Caused by New Variants of Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor, India. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 15(2), 352-354. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.080943.
        Email Email this Article
  • Human Case of Atopobium rimae Bacteremia PDF Version [PDF - 94 KB - 1 page]
    E. Angelakis et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Angelakis E, Roux V, Raoult D, Drancourt M. Human Case of Atopobium rimae Bacteremia. Emerg Infect Dis. 2009;15(2):354-355. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.071399
    AMA Angelakis E, Roux V, Raoult D, et al. Human Case of Atopobium rimae Bacteremia. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2009;15(2):354-355. doi:10.3201/eid1502.071399.
    APA Angelakis, E., Roux, V., Raoult, D., & Drancourt, M. (2009). Human Case of Atopobium rimae Bacteremia. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 15(2), 354-355. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.071399.
        Email Email this Article
  • Systemic Infection with Enteric Adenovirus in Immunocompetent Child with Haemophilus influenzae Disease PDF Version [PDF - 99 KB - 3 pages]
    N. Khetsuriani et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Khetsuriani N, Tong S, Lu X, Reed S, Erdman DD, Campbell AP, et al. Systemic Infection with Enteric Adenovirus in Immunocompetent Child with Haemophilus influenzae Disease. Emerg Infect Dis. 2009;15(2):355-357. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.081066
    AMA Khetsuriani N, Tong S, Lu X, et al. Systemic Infection with Enteric Adenovirus in Immunocompetent Child with Haemophilus influenzae Disease. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2009;15(2):355-357. doi:10.3201/eid1502.081066.
    APA Khetsuriani, N., Tong, S., Lu, X., Reed, S., Erdman, D. D., Campbell, A. P....Olsen, S. J. (2009). Systemic Infection with Enteric Adenovirus in Immunocompetent Child with Haemophilus influenzae Disease. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 15(2), 355-357. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.081066.
        Email Email this Article
  • Mesotherapy-associated Outbreak Caused by Mycobacterium immunogenum PDF Version [PDF - 238 KB - 3 pages]
    M. del Castillo et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID del Castillo M, Palmero D, Lopez B, Paul R, Ritacco V, Bonvehi P, et al. Mesotherapy-associated Outbreak Caused by Mycobacterium immunogenum. Emerg Infect Dis. 2009;15(2):357-359. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.081125
    AMA del Castillo M, Palmero D, Lopez B, et al. Mesotherapy-associated Outbreak Caused by Mycobacterium immunogenum. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2009;15(2):357-359. doi:10.3201/eid1502.081125.
    APA del Castillo, M., Palmero, D., Lopez, B., Paul, R., Ritacco, V., Bonvehi, P....Vay, C. (2009). Mesotherapy-associated Outbreak Caused by Mycobacterium immunogenum. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 15(2), 357-359. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.081125.
        Email Email this Article

Books and Media

About the Cover

  • … Myself That I Remake PDF Version [PDF - 146 KB - 2 pages]
    P. Potter
            Cite This Article
    EID Potter P. … Myself That I Remake. Emerg Infect Dis. 2009;15(2):361-362. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.AC1502
    AMA Potter P. … Myself That I Remake. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2009;15(2):361-362. doi:10.3201/eid1502.AC1502.
    APA Potter, P. (2009). … Myself That I Remake. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 15(2), 361-362. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1502.AC1502.
        Email Email this Article
TOP