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Podcasts

New Podcasts

Visions of Matchstick Men and Icons of Industrialization

Anthrax, People and Dead Hippos

Chaos in Form and Color Yields to Harmony

Analysis of Whole-Genome Data in a Public Health Lab

Forty Years of Salmonella enterica Dublin in People

Legionnaires' Disease and Compost

Global Health Security

Past Podcasts

Volume 7-2001 and Volume 5- 1999 are links to podcasts recorded in 2015 about articles that appeared in EID during those years.

Volume 13—2007

image of the 'Thumbnail' version of the Volume 13, Number 10—October 2007 cover of the CDC's EID journal

Volume 13, Number 10—October 2007

Dengue Fever Seroprevalence and Risk Factors, Texas–Mexico Border, 2004

Dengue fever is both endemic and underrecognized along a section of the southern Texas–Mexico border, and low income is a primary risk factor for infection. As part of a special section on Global Poverty and Human Development, Dr. Joan Marie Brunkard discusses a dengue seroprevalence survey in this region and what can be done to help prevent infection and to identify and treat those who are infected.

View full-text article: Dengue Fever Seroprevalence and Risk Factors, Texas–Mexico Border, 2004

image of the 'Thumbnail' version of the Volume 13, Number 9—September 2007 cover of the CDC's EID journal

Volume 13, Number 9—September 2007

Increase in Clostridium difficile–related Mortality Rates, United States, 1999–2004

Deaths related to Clostridium difficile are on the rise in the United States. Matthew Redelings from the Los Angeles County Department of Health discusses the increase and what can be done to prevent this infection.

View full-text article: Increase in Clostridium difficile–related Mortality Rates, United States, 19992004

image of the 'Thumbnail' version of the Volume 13, Number 7—July 2007 cover of the CDC's EID journal

Volume 13, Number 7—July 2007

Brazilian Vaccinia Viruses and Their Origins

Smallpox was eradicated more than 25 years ago, but live viruses used in vaccines may have survived to cause animal and human illness today. Dr. Inger Damon, Acting Branch Chief of the Poxvirus and Rabies Branch at CDC, discusses efforts to determine origins and spread of vaccinia viruses in Brazil.

View full-text article: Brazilian Vaccinia Viruses and Their Origins

image of the 'Thumbnail' version of the Volume 13, Number 6—June 2007 cover of the CDC's EID journal

Volume 13, Number 6—June 2007

Strategies to Reduce Person-to-Person Transmission During Widespread Escherichia coli O157:H7 Outbreak

US consumers were warned not to eat raw spinach during a 2006 E. coli O157:H7 outbreak, but additional warnings about person-to-person transmission could have reduced bacteria spread. Dr. Martin Meltzer discusses the research methods and findings and the authors' success in presenting them clearly and accurately.

View full-text article: Strategies to Reduce Person-to-Person Transmission during Widespread Escherichia coli O157:H7 Outbreak

image of the 'Thumbnail' version of the Volume 13, Number 5—May 2007 cover of the CDC's EID journal

Volume 13, Number 5—May 2007

Pet Rodents and Fatal Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis in Transplant Patients

Three organ transplant recipients died from infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), which was traced back to a hamster owned by the daughter of the organ donor. Dr. Brian Amman, a mammalogist with the Special Pathogens Branch at CDC, discusses the dangers LCMV may pose to people with immune disorders, as well as to pregnant women.

View full-text article: Pet Rodents and Fatal Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis in Transplant Patients

image of the 'Thumbnail' version of the Volume 13, Number 4—April 2007 cover of the CDC's EID journal

Volume 13, Number 4—April 2007

Human Benefits of Animal Interventions for Zoonosis Control

Industrialized countries have contained recent zoonotic disease outbreaks, but countries with limited resources cannot respond adequately. Dr. Nina Marano, veterinarian and Chief, Geographic Medicine and Health Promotion Branch, CDC, comments on the focus on animal reservoirs to prevent outbreaks in developing nations.

View full-text article: Human Benefits of Animal Interventions for Zoonosis Control

image of the 'Thumbnail' version of the Volume 13, Number 3—March 2007 cover of the CDC's EID journal

Volume 13, Number 3—March 2007

Emergence of Extensively Drug Resistant Tuberculosis

Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR TB) outbreaks have been reported in South Africa, and strains have been identified on 6 continents. Dr. Peter Cegielski, team leader for drug-resistant TB with the Division of Tuberculosis Elimination at CDC, comments on a multinational team's report on this emerging global public health threat.

View full-text article: Worldwide Emergence of Extensively Drug-resistant Tuberculosis

image of the 'Thumbnail' version of the Volume 13, Number 2—February 2007 cover of the CDC's EID journal

Volume 13, Number 2—February 2007

Insecticide Resistance Reducing Effectiveness of Malaria Control

Malaria prevention is increasingly insecticide based. Dr. John Gimnig, an entomologist with the Division of Parasitic Diseases, CDC, discusses evidence that mosquito resistance to insecticides, which is measured in the laboratory, could compromise malaria prevention in the field.

View full-text article: Reduced Efficacy of Insecticide-treated Nets and Indoor Residual Spraying for Malaria Control in Pyrethroid Resistance Area, Benin

image of the 'Thumbnail' version of the Volume 13, Number 1—January 2007 cover of the CDC's EID journal

Volume 13, Number 1—January 2007

Spread of Rare Fungus from Vancouver Island

Cryptococcus gattii, a rare fungus normally found in the tropics, has infected people and animals on Vancouver Island, Canada. Dr. David Warnock, Director, Division of Foodborne, Bacterial, and Mycotic Diseases, CDC, discusses public health concerns about further spread of this organism.

View full-text articles: Spread of Cryptococcus gattii in British Columbia, Canada, and Detection in the Pacific Northwest, USA; Cryptococcus gattii Dispersal Mechanisms, British Columbia, Canada; and Cryptococcus gattii Risk for Tourists Visiting Vancouver Island, Canada

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