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Appendices Appendices

Appendix B: Travel Vaccine Summary Table

Johanzynn Gatewood

Table B-01 is a quick reference for administering or prescribing travel-related vaccines. Before administering any vaccine, please pay particular attention to the dose and whether it is to be administered intramuscularly or subcutaneously. Also review detailed instruc­tions, contraindications, precautions, and side effects under the specific vaccines discussed in this book or in the manufacturer’s prescrib­ing information. For other immunizations, refer to the corresponding disease section in Chapter 4.

Table B-01. Travel vaccine summary

VACCINE TRADE NAME (MANUFACTURER) AGE DOSE ROUTE SCHED-
ULE
BOOSTER
Cholera CVD 103-HgR vaccine Vaxchora (PaxVax) 18–64 y 100 mL (reconstituted) Oral 1 dose1 Undetermined2
Hepatitis A vaccine, inactivated Havrix (GlaxoSmithKline) 1–18 y 0.5 mL (720 ELISA units) IM 0 and 6–12 mo None
≥19 y 1.0 mL (1,440 ELISA units) IM 0 and 6–12 mo None
Hepatitis A vaccine, inactivated Vaqta (Merck & Co., Inc.) 1–18 y 0.5 mL (25 U) IM 0 and 6–18 mo None
≥19 y 1.0 mL (50 U) IM 0 and 6–18 mo None
Hepatitis B vaccine, recombinant with novel adjuvant (1018) Heplisav- B (Dynavax Technologies Corp.) >18 0.5 mL (20 μg HBsAg and 3,000 μg of 1018) IM 0, 1 mo None
Hepatitis B vaccine, recombinant2 Engerix-B (GlaxoSmithKline) 0–19 y 0.5 mL (10 μg HBsAg) IM 0, 1, 6 mo None
0–10 y (accelerated) 0.5 mL (10 μg HBsAg) IM 0, 1, 2 mo 12 mo
11–19 y (accelerated) 1 mL (20 μg HBsAg) IM 0, 1, 2 mo 12 mo
≥20 y (primary) 1 mL (20 μg HBsAg) IM 0, 1, 6 mo None
≥20 y (accelerated) 1 mL (20 μg HBsAg) IM 0, 1, 2 mo 12 mo
Hepatitis B vaccine, recombinant2 Recombivax HB (Merck & Co., Inc.) 0–19 y (primary) 0.5 mL (5 μg HBsAg) IM 0, 1, 6 mo None
11–15 y (adolescent accelerated) 1 mL (10 μg HBsAg) IM 0, 4–6 mo None
≥20 y (primary) 1 mL (10 μg HBsAg) IM 0, 1, 6 mo None
Combined hepatitis A and hepatitis B vaccine Twinrix (GlaxoSmithKline) ≥18 y (primary) 1.0 mL (720 ELU HAV + 20μg HBsAg) IM 0, 1, 6 mo None
≥18 y (accelerated) 1.0 mL (720 ELU HAV + 20μg HBsAg) IM 0, 7, and 21–30 d 12 mo
Japanese encepha-
litis vaccine, inactivated
Ixiaro (Valneva) 2 mo–2 y 0.25 mL IM 0, 28 d ≥1 year after primary series4
3–17 y 0.5 mL IM 0, 28 d ≥1 year after primary series4
18–65 y 0.5 mL IM 0, 7–28 d ≥1 year after primary series4
>65 y 0.5 mL IM 0, 28 d ≥1 year after primary series4
Meningo-
coccal polysaccharide diphtheria toxoid conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-D)5
Menactra
(Sanofi Pasteur)
 9–23 mo 0.5 mL IM 0, 3 mo If at continued risk7
≥2 y 0.5 mL IM 1 dose6 If at continued risk7
Meningo-
coccal oligosaccharide diphtheria CRM197 conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-CRM)5
Menveo
(GSK)
 2–12 mo 0.5 mL IM 0, 2, 4, 10 mo If at continued risk7
7–23 y 0.5 mL IM 0,3 mo (2nd dose administered in 2nd year of life)  
 ≥2 y 0.5 mL IM 1 dose6  
Polio vaccine, inactivated Ipol (Sanofi Pasteur) ≥18 y 0.5 mL SC or IM 1 dose if patient has completed a pediatric series Repeat boosters may be needed for long-term travelers to polio-affected countries; see Chapter 4, Polio
Rabies vaccine (human diploid cell) Imovax (Sanofi Pasteur) Any 1 mL IM Preexposure series: days 0, 7, and 21 or 28 d None; see See Chapter 4, Rabies for postexposure immunization
Rabies vaccine (purified chick embryo cell) RabAvert (Novartis) Any 1 mL IM Preexposure series: days 0, 7, and 21 or 28 d None; see See Chapter 4, Rabies for postexposure immunization
Typhoid vaccine (oral, live, attenuated) Vivotif (PaxVax) ≥6 y 1 capsule8 Oral 0, 2, 4, 6 d Repeat primary series after 5 y
Typhoid vaccine (Vi capsular polysaccharide) Typhim Vi (Sanofi Pasteur) ≥2 y 0.5 mL IM 1 dose 2 y
Yellow fever YF-Vax (Sanofi Pasteur) ≥9 mo9 0.5 mL10 SC 1 dose Not recommended for most9

Abbreviations: ACIP, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices; ELU, ELISA units of inactivated HAV; HAV, hepatitis A virus; HBsAg, hepatitis B surface antigen; IM, intramuscular; U, units
HAV antigen; SC, subcutaneous.
1 Must be administered in a health care setting.
2 In a clinical trial, vaccine efficacy was 90% at 10 days postvaccination and declined to 80% at 3 months postvaccination in prevention of severe diarrhea after oral cholera challenge.
Long- term immunogenicity is unknown. Clinicians advising travelers who are at continued or repeated risk over an extended period may consider revaccination, although the appropriate
interval and efficacy are unknown.
3 Consult the prescribing information for differences in dosing for hemodialysis and other immunocompromised patients.
4 If potential for Japanese encephalitis virus exposure continues.
5 If an infant is receiving the vaccine before travel, 2 doses may be administered as early as 8 weeks apart.
6 For people with HIV, anatomic or functional asplenia, and people with persistent complement component deficiencies (C3, C5- 9, properdin, factor D, and factor H or people taking
eculizumab [Soliris]) should receive a 2-dose primary series 8–12 weeks apart.
7 Revaccination with meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-D or MenACWY-CRM) is recommended after 3 years for children who received their last dose at <7 years of age.
Revaccination with meningococcal conjugate vaccine is recommended after 5 years for people who received their last dose at ≥7 years of age, and every 5 years thereafter for people who
are at continued risk.
8 Must be kept refrigerated at 35.6°F–46.4°F (2°C–8°C); administer with cool liquid no warmer than 98.6°F (37°C).
9 Ages 6–8 months and ≥60 years are precautions and age <6 months is a contraindication to the use of yellow fever vaccine.
10 YF Vax is available in single-dose and multiple-dose (5-dose) vials.
11 For full details regarding revaccination, see “Vaccine Administration” in Chapter 4, Yellow Fever.

 

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